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How to fix things in Italian part 3

We've talked about two words to use when we need something fixed: sistemare and riparare. Here's another: accommodare. This verb looks a lot like the English verb to accommodate and while they both come from the same Latin word "accomodare" they are not true cognates.

 

Accomodare

Questa bici è vecchia ma l'ho fatta accommodare da un amico esperto e sembra nuova.

This bike is old, but I had it fixed up by a friend who's an expert, and it's just like new.

 

BANNER PLACEHOLDER

It could be that the verb accomodare is used less frequently than some others to mean "to repair" but it's good to know it exists, as you might hear it and get confused if you hadn't read this lesson!

 

When getting something repaired, it's common to use the verb fare (to make, to do) and the infinitive form of the verb accomodare as in our example above: fare accomodare (to get repaired). Let's keep in mind that used this way, accomodare is a transitive verb, in other words, it takes a direct object.

 

As with sistemare, accomodare can be used to mean to tidy up, to arrange, as in getting a bedroom ready for someone. 

Ho accommodato la stanza dove dormirai.

I got the room where you'll be sleeping ready for you.

 

Accomodarsi

As with many verbs, there is a reflexive form of accomodare, and in this case, it has come to mean something completely different from the normal verb. Here, we can also see a connection with the adjective comodo (comfortable, at ease). 

 

This verb is very important when someone invites you into their house. Of course, when you enter, it is always polite to say permesso. You're asking permission to come in. 

Con permesso? Permesso?

May I come in? May I come in?

Caption 31, Il Commissario Manara S2EP1 - Matrimonio con delitto - Part 10

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One answer you might get is this, especially if you know the person well: 

Posso? -Vieni. Accomodati. Ti ho portato i prospetti che mi avevi chiesto.

May I? -Come in. Have a seat. I brought the forecasts you had asked me for.

Captions 19-20, Questione di Karma Rai Cinema - Part 14

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In the example above, the reflexive accomodarsi is used in the second person singular imperative. It can mean "Have a seat" but can also mean, "Make yourself comfortable," "Get yourself settled." 

 

If you are staying with someone, perhaps they will show you to your room. They might say:

Ti faccio accomodare qui.

You can get settled in here. 

 

 The same goes for when you have dinner. 

Se ho degli ospiti a pranzo o a cena, li faccio accomodare qui, su [sic: a] questo tavolo.

If I have guests for lunch or for dinner, I have them sit here, on [sic, at] this table.

Captions 34-36, Marika spiega Il salone

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Accomodarsi is used in the polite form as well, especially in offices, and is one way of inviting you in, but can also mean "please have a seat." In the following example, it's combined with venga  — the polite singular imperative form of venire (to come).

Commissario, c'è la signora Fello. Signora Fello, venga. -Permesso? -Venga, si accomodi.

Chief, Missus Fello is here. Missus Fello, come in. -May I? -Come in, have a seat.

Captions 37-39, Il Commissario Manara S2EP10 -La verità nascosta - Part 3

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If you read our lessons regularly, you might have come across a lesson about the adjective comodo, which has a couple of different meanings. The lesson also discusses accomodarsi briefly, so check it out here.

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Using accomodarsi in sentences can be challenging, but it's important to have the verb comfortably in your vocabulary toolbox. So if you have questions such as "How do I say __________ in Italian," we are here to help! Write to us at newsletter@yabla.com.

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