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Reflections on the Reflexive

We talked a little about reflexive personal pronouns in Ci Gets Around. They are: mi (myself), ti (yourself), ci (ourselves), si (himself/herself/itself/themselves), and vi (yourselves). 

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The reflexive is necessary in Italian when someone (or something) is both the doer and the receiver of an action. Reflexive pronouns will be found lurking somewhere in the sentence, or attached either to the main verb or helping verb (like fare). The reflexive is worth paying attention to because it’s used a lot more than we might think, and its presence will often change the meaning of the verb it refers to in a subtle but important way. We saw this in the lesson Making It Happen with the verb prestare

So, for instance, if you hide something, the verb you are looking for is nascondere

E poi, ho pensato di nascondere il corpo e...

And then, I thought of hiding the body and...

Caption 44, Il Commissario Manara: Vendemmia tardiva - Ep 2 - Part 14 of 17

But if you are the one hiding, you’ll need the reflexive form, nascondersi (literally, to hide oneself). A marine biologist dives down to the bottom of the sea surrounding the Aeolian Islands to show us the beautiful creatures there.

Probabilmente, sta cercando una tana per nascondersi da me.

It's probably looking for a cave in order to hide from me.

Caption 22, Linea Blu: Le Eolie - Part 7 of 19

The same holds here, where avvicinare, by itself, means to move something closer. But if you add the reflexive, it’s something or someone that is getting closer. 

Il prossimo che si avvicina all'acquario, m'ingoio voi e tutta la famiglia.

The next one who comes near the aquarium, I'll swallow you and the whole family.

Caption 40, Acqua in bocca: Mp3 Marino - Ep 2

When it’s all about you, you’ll use the reflexive with many of the verbs you use to talk about your daily routines. 

Di solito, io mi sveglio alle sette in punto.

Usually, I wake up at seven on the dot.

Caption 4, Marika spiega: L'orologio

Sometimes fare (in its reflexive form) gets called in for an assist: instead of docciarsi (to shower), we can say farsi la doccia (to take a shower):

Mi faccio la doccia alle sette e mezza.

I take a shower at half past seven.

Caption 6, Marika spiega: L'orologio

Now you should be ready to reflect on the reflexive! Get the whole picture on reflexive verbs here. For the scoop on reflexive pronouns, you can get help here. For even more on the reflexive, see this online resource.

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Learning suggestion:

Try to put your daily routine into words, using the dictionary (and the above-mentioned online resources) if necessary. Maybe your routine goes something like this:

Ti svegli alle 6 di mattina ma ti addormenti di nuovo e quindi ti alzi alle sei e mezza. Ti fai un buon caffè e poi ti fai la doccia, ti lavi i denti, e ti vesti. Se fa freddo ti metti una giacca prima di uscire.* Nascondi la chiave sotto lo zerbino. Ti fai prestare un biglietto per l’autobus.

You wake up at 6 in the morning, but you fall asleep again so you get up at 6:30. You make yourself a nice cup of coffee and then you take a shower, you brush your teeth and you get dressed. If it’s cold, you put on a jacket before going out. You hide the key under the doormat. You borrow a ticket for the bus.

*More about what to wear in Marika spiega: L'abbigliamento - Part 1 of 2.

Tocca a te! (It’s your turn!)

Grammar

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