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Corso di italiano con Daniela - Piacere - Part 1 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Daniela tackles a verb that is tricky for English speakers: piacere (to like, to delight, to please). Since, as you will see, this verb works so differently than "to like," we have used the verb "to delight" as a translation in some cases, not for its exact meaning, but in order to match the construction with that of piacere.

Alberto Angela - Meraviglie - EP. 4 - Part 6 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Intermediate Intermediate

Italy

We move from Umbria to Tuscany and visit the evocative ruins of the abbey of San Galgano. Next will be Pisa, a prime example of how Tuscany, in medieval times, was experimenting with very "modern" ideas.

COVID-19 - Domande frequenti - Part 2 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Marika talks about how one can contract coronavirus, the symptoms, and the guidelines to avoid getting infected.

COVID-19 - Domande frequenti - Part 1 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Everyone is talking about coronavirus. Marika addresses frequently asked questions about this recent, ongoing phenomenon.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Particella Ci e Ne - Part 6 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Daniela gives us plenty of examples of how to use ne and ci, those tricky little particles that mean so many different things and which can be quite a challenge for English speakers.

Alberto Angela - Meraviglie - EP. 4 - Part 5 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Intermediate Intermediate

Italy

Alberto Angela points out how realistic Giotto's frescoes are compared to earlier ones. He also mentions the important fact that Saint Francis composed one of the first poems in the vernacular

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Particella Ci e Ne - Part 5 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Daniela gives us some more examples of how the particle ci is used. Lots of times it's superfluous and could technically be omitted but hardly ever is.

Alberto Angela - Meraviglie - EP. 4 - Part 4 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Intermediate Intermediate

Italy

We move from the lower basilica to the upper one, which has an entirely different feel to it. Here, we are surrounded by a show of light and color in colorful frescoes and stained-glass windows.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Particella Ci e Ne - Part 4 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Daniela talks about an unusual but common way we use the particle ci. In this segment she discusses volerci (to need, to take) and metterci (to employ, to put in). In English we use "it takes" and "it takes me/you/us/him/her/them" with an impersonal "it," so translating might very well create more problems than it solves. To help you understand how these particular verbs work, we have attempted, where possible, to use alternate translations to illustrate the grammatical structure of the sentences Daniela uses as examples.

Alberto Angela - Meraviglie - EP. 4 - Part 3 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Intermediate Intermediate

Italy

What did Saint Francis look like? There are clues in a fresco in the lower basilica of the church dedicated to him in Assisi.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Particella Ci e Ne - Part 3 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

We learn even more about the particle ci. This short word can stand for a preposition (such as "on," "about," "with," or "to") + an indirect object.

Alberto Angela - Meraviglie - EP. 4 - Part 2 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Intermediate Intermediate

Italy

People often wonder how the Basilica of St. Francis could be as imposing and rich as it is, when the saint to whom it is dedicated had taken an oath of poverty. Alberto Angela explains this and other contradictions.

L'Italia a tavola - Interrogazione sul Molise View Series

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Nobody in the class volunteers to talk about the Molise region, but by chance, Anna gets called on. And we get to learn all about this small region.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Particella Ci e Ne - Part 2 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Ci is such a tiny word, but it has a lot of power. It can replace a direct object pronoun or an indirect pronoun + preposition, and means other things as well. You won't want to miss this lesson.

Alberto Angela - Meraviglie - EP. 4 - Part 1 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Intermediate Intermediate

Italy

This episode will take us to Umbria. We start with one of the most beautiful cities in the region, Assisi, a city that's practically synonymous with the Franciscan monastic order and its founder, Saint Francis.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Particella Ci e Ne - Part 1 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

It's time to talk about particelle (particles). These short, two or three-letter words, such as ci and ne have many functions as well as meanings, and can even represent an indirect object pronoun plus its preposition. Particles can be freestanding or attached to a verb, depending on how the verb is conjugated (or not). Let's see how they work.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Aggettivi indefiniti - Part 7 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Here is the last group of indefinite adjectives: qualunque, qualsiasi, and qualsivoglia (whichever, any). Luckily for us, they are generally interchangeable and invariable.

Marika spiega - Cosa - Part 2 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

The word cosa (thing, something, what) is used a great deal in Italian. In speech, it's especially used in questions to mean "what." Marika explains how this works.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Aggettivi indefiniti - Part 6 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Here are three more indefinite adjectives. The third one altro (another, next, last, different) is very common and can mean several things, so context is key.

Marika spiega - Cosa - Part 1 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

The word cosa (thing) in Italian is an extremely useful word, especially when you don't know the real word for something. Marika tells us about how it's used in Italian everyday conversation.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Aggettivi indefiniti - Part 5 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

In this lesson, Daniela discusses indefinite adjectives that refer to units or multiples. We're talking about adjectives such as "each," every," and "certain." Some have variable endings and others do not.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Aggettivi indefiniti - Part 4 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Listen carefully to this lesson because the rules for these indefinite adjectives are a little quirky. These are about totality — all or nothing — and work differently from English, especially when they're in the negative. We're talking about tutto, nessuno, and alcuno.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Aggettivi indefiniti - Part 3 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Daniela shows us some additional indefinite adjectives that have to do with quantity. When used as adjectives, they need to agree, in gender and number, with the nouns they describe. Some of these words can also be used as adverbs, and in this case, they don't change.

Marika spiega - Come - Part 2 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

In this second part, you will master using come (how) in questions and exclamations.

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