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Marika spiega - Biancheria View Series

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

The noun biancheria (linens) comes from bianco, the Italian word for "white." Marika tells us why that is, and takes us around the house to look at the different kinds we use.

Marika commenta -La Ladra - Espressioni idiomatiche - Part 3 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Chiudere il cerchio, mancare all'appello, mettercela tutta, and non c'è verso di are the four idomatic expression Marika explains in this video. Let's find out what they mean. The third expression is actually un verbo pronominale.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Forma negativa - Part 5 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Daniela concludes this lesson about double negatives explaining that in some cases, when using double negatives with compound verbs — in other words, auxiliary verbs with past participles — there are some exceptions to be aware of.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Forma negativa - Part 4 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Double negatives are, in fact, allowed in Italian. And Daniela shows us how there can be multiple negations in one phrase. In English, where double negatives are not allowed, we have extra words to get around this rule. We use, for example, "it's not anything" or" not ever," instead of the incorrect "not nothing" or "not never." But it's important to be able to manage all these negatives in perfect tenses where we have a conjugated auxiliary verb and a past participle, and that is what Daniela explains in this lesson.

Marika commenta - L'ispettore Manara - Parole ripetute View Series

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

There are a couple of words in particular that Italians like to repeat over and over again to forcefully encourage an action. Marika talks about these and other repeated words in the Commissioner Manara series.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Forma negativa - Part 3 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

To express negation, the adverb non (not) can precede not only nouns, but verbs, adjectives, pronouns, prepositions, and adverbs, as well. Daniela shows us how.

Marika commenta - L'ispettore Manara - Espressioni toscane View Series

Difficulty: difficulty - Intermediate Intermediate

Italy

The popular TV series Commissioner Manara takes place in Tuscany, so in this video, Marika explains some of the peculiarities of Tuscan speech. She also gives some important tips about using articles when referring to family members.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Forma negativa - Part 2 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

In the last lesson we learned to place non (not) before the verb in a negative sentence, but when there are other words involved, it gets a bit more complicated, especially when we have object pronouns in the mix.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Forma negativa - Part 1 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Daniela explains how to turn a positive statement into a negative one, and how to form a negative question and its negative answer. The magic word is non (not).

Marika commenta -La Ladra - Espressioni idiomatiche - Part 2 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Here are some more idiomatic expressions from La Ladra. They involve music, horses, and sweets.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Pronomi relativi - Part 6 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

To finish up about relative pronouns, Daniela illustrates how we can use the adverb dove (where) to replace the relative pronoun in cui or nel quale, both of which mean "in which."

Marika commenta -La Ladra - Espressioni idiomatiche - Part 1 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Idiomatic expressions are often difficult to translate or to find in a dictionary. Marika helps us out, using clips from La Ladra already present in Yabla's library.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Pronomi relativi - Part 5 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

These relative pronouns can be very tricky for English speakers. Daniela gives us some good reasons (with examples) to prefer the more difficult, but more specific il quale, la quale, i quali and le quali, which can all mean "that, "which," "who," or "whom," depending on the context.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Pronomi relativi - Part 4 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Daniela introduces relative pronouns il quale, la quale, i quali and le quali (that, who, which) that are a bit tricky to use because they have to agree with the gender and number of the nouns they refer to. We need them when, otherwise, the sentence would be ambiguous.

Marika spiega - Oggetti in ufficio View Series

Difficulty: difficulty - Newbie Newbie

Italy

Marika shows us what materials she uses in her small home office. Whether you work or go to school, these terms will come in handy.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Pronomi relativi - Part 3 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Daniela introduces the relative pronoun "which." It's handy to know because it doesn't change according to gender or number.

L'Italia a tavola - Interrogazione sulla Lombardia View Series

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Today the lesson is about Lombardy. Anna is well-prepared, but her maestra seems to be affected by la nebbia (the fog). Is it the Milanese climate? Or could it be something else?

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Pronomi relativi - Part 2 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Daniela shows us how to use the relative pronoun che. In English this can be translated as either "that," "which," or "who," depending on various English grammatical factors.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Pronomi relativi - Part 1 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Relative pronouns — such as "who," "that," and "which" — connect a main clause to a subordinate clause, which in this case, is a relative clause. Here, relative pronouns function as pronouns and conjunctions at the same time. In Italian, some relative pronouns vary according to gender and number, and others don't. Daniela guides us through.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Superlativo relativo View Series

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

With the relative superlative, we compare one element with an entire group, as for example, "She is the most beautiful of all." In English we distinguish between "more" and "most," but in Italian, the presence of the article before the noun or before the comparative word is what makes the difference.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Superlativo assoluto - Part 3 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Intermediate Intermediate

Italy

Daniela discusses how journalists and the mass media often tack on -issimo to nouns and adverbial expressions, something which is not strictly correct but is prevalent nonetheless.

L'Italia a tavola - Interrogazione sulla Toscana View Series

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Anna knows all about Tuscany, one of her favorite regions. Tuscany was very important for the evolution of the Italian language, and is one of the areas of Italy most frequented by tourists.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Superlativo assoluto - Part 2 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Daniela illustrates other ways of forming the absolute superlative for adjectives in Italian. These include repeating an adjective twice, the placement of a prefix before an adjective, and a list of words, such as "exceedingly," used in conjunction with an adjective.

L'Italia a tavola - Interrogazione sul Lazio View Series

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Anna volunteers to be questioned about Lazio. The teacher seems to be in a good mood, so Anna is encouraged. What grade will she receive?

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