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Corso di italiano con Daniela - Particella Ci e Ne - Part 3 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

We learn even more about the particle ci. This short word can stand for a preposition (such as "on," "about," "with," or "to") + an indirect object.

Alberto Angela - Meraviglie - EP. 4 - Part 2 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Intermediate Intermediate

Italy

People often wonder how the Basilica of St. Francis could be as imposing and rich as it is, when the saint to whom it is dedicated had taken an oath of poverty. Alberto Angela explains this and other contradictions.

L'Italia a tavola - Interrogazione sul Molise View Series

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Nobody in the class volunteers to talk about the Molise region, but by chance, Anna gets called on. And we get to learn all about this small region.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Particella Ci e Ne - Part 2 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Ci is such a tiny word, but it has a lot of power. It can replace a direct object pronoun or an indirect pronoun + preposition, and means other things as well. You won't want to miss this lesson.

Alberto Angela - Meraviglie - EP. 4 - Part 1 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Intermediate Intermediate

Italy

This episode will take us to Umbria. We start with one of the most beautiful cities in the region, Assisi, a city that's practically synonymous with the Franciscan monastic order and its founder, Saint Francis.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Particella Ci e Ne - Part 1 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

It's time to talk about particelle (particles). These short, two or three-letter words, such as ci and ne have many functions as well as meanings, and can even represent an indirect object pronoun plus its preposition. Particles can be freestanding or attached to a verb, depending on how the verb is conjugated (or not). Let's see how they work.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Aggettivi indefiniti - Part 7 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Here is the last group of indefinite adjectives: qualunque, qualsiasi, and qualsivoglia (whichever, any). Luckily for us, they are generally interchangeable and invariable.

Marika spiega - Cosa - Part 2 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

The word cosa (thing, something, what) is used a great deal in Italian. In speech, it's especially used in questions to mean "what." Marika explains how this works.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Aggettivi indefiniti - Part 6 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Here are three more indefinite adjectives. The third one altro (another, next, last, different) is very common and can mean several things, so context is key.

Marika spiega - Cosa - Part 1 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

The word cosa (thing) in Italian is an extremely useful word, especially when you don't know the real word for something. Marika tells us about how it's used in Italian everyday conversation.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Aggettivi indefiniti - Part 5 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

In this lesson, Daniela discusses indefinite adjectives that refer to units or multiples. We're talking about adjectives such as "each," every," and "certain." Some have variable endings and others do not.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Aggettivi indefiniti - Part 4 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Listen carefully to this lesson because the rules for these indefinite adjectives are a little quirky. These are about totality — all or nothing — and work differently from English, especially when they're in the negative. We're talking about tutto, nessuno, and alcuno.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Aggettivi indefiniti - Part 3 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Daniela shows us some additional indefinite adjectives that have to do with quantity. When used as adjectives, they need to agree, in gender and number, with the nouns they describe. Some of these words can also be used as adverbs, and in this case, they don't change.

Marika spiega - Come - Part 2 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

In this second part, you will master using come (how) in questions and exclamations.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Aggettivi indefiniti - Part 2 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Daniela talks about some very common indefinite adjectives, the equivalents of "much," "many," "little," and "few." An important detail to keep in mind is that some of the words she talks about can be either adjectives or adverbs depending on the context. Adjectives (the subject of this video) have variable endings but adverbs don't.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Aggettivi indefiniti - Part 1 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Daniela introduces the topic of indefinite adjectives and starts with quantitative adjectives (think: some, several, etc.). In Italian, not only do we need to think about singular and plural, but also masculine and feminine, just as with other adjectives, so put on your seat belts!

Marika spiega - Come - Part 1 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Come is an important question word that means "how," but it also fulfills plenty of other roles. Marika spells out the ways...

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Aggettivi e pronomi dimostrativi - Part 3 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

To finish up about demonstrative adjectives and pronouns, Daniela gives us some more examples and a summary.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Aggettivi e pronomi dimostrativi - Part 2 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Demonstrative adjectives can also be used as demonstrative pronouns. Daniela explains how that works, and also discusses how to use an apostrophe when the noun following the demonstrative adjective starts with a vowel.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Aggettivi e pronomi dimostrativi - Part 1 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Daniela explains how to use the demonstrative adjectives questo and quello [this and that]. She also tells us about a third demonstrative adjective that, these days, is used only in Tuscany: codesto.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Pronomi combinati - Part 7 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

In this last segment, Daniela focuses on when the past participle of a verb in the present perfect has to agree (in number and gender) with the direct object pronoun when using compound pronouns. It's a bit tricky.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Pronomi combinati - Part 6 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Daniela focuses on the partitive ne when joined to combined pronouns in the third person singular, masculine or feminine. In this case, the indirect pronoun aspect stays the same in both the masculine and feminine, singular and plural.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Pronomi combinati - Part 5 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Daniela sums up about compound pronouns and explains what a partitive pronoun is. An example of a partitive pronoun is the particle ne (of it, of them).

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Pronomi combinati - Part 4 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

There are two ways to position the combined pronoun in relation to the verb in some cases, and Daniela shows us how it's done. She gives examples of this with the infinitive, the imperative and the gerund.

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