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Marika spiega - Adottare dei gatti - Part 2 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Intermediate Intermediate

Italy

Adopting a dog means going through several steps. Marika describes what she and her family went through in attempting to realize their dream of having a puppy.

Marika spiega - Adottare dei gatti - Part 1 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Intermediate Intermediate

Italy

Marika shares some of her childhood with us, specifically, her experience of having a puppy grow up beside her as part of the family. Now she has children of her own, and wants to give them that same special experience.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Ora - Part 2 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Ora, the word for "now" can be combined with a number of other words to means something that has to do with time, but that indicates more precisely when a period begins or ends.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Ora - Part 1 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Daniela looks at the various contexts for using the adverb ora (now) and its synonyms and variants.

Marika commenta - L'ispettore Manara - Espressioni idiomatiche - Part 2 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Marika explains some of the idiomatic expressions used in the TV series, Commissario Manara. These expressions are ones Italians use every day in dealing with other people, so you won't want to miss this.

Marika commenta - L'ispettore Manara - Espressioni idiomatiche - Part 1 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Some idiomatic expressions need some explanation and Marika is here to do just that, this time using examples from the popular TV series, Commissario Manara. You'll be speaking Italian like a native in no time.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Fino a e Finché - Part 2 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Adv-Intermediate Adv-Intermediate

Italy

In English, the difference between "until" and "as long as" is quite distinct, but in Italian, it's a little blurry because the presence of the negative word non (not) might change the meaning of a phrase or it might not. When the meaning is not altered by its presence, the word, in this case non (not), is "pleonastic." We're talking about finché and finche non.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Fino a e Finché - Part 1 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

A student asked Daniela to explain the difference between finché and the adverb fino. In fact, these words are tricky for English speakers to grasp. We're talking about "until" and "as long as," and in questions, "how far" and "how long."

Marika spiega - Conversazione - Part 2 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Marika and Daniela continue their conversation about making conversation in Italian. They even talk a little bit about baby talk, Italian style, including the vezzeggiativo (affectionate) form of adjectives.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Modi Indefiniti - Part 4 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Intermediate Intermediate

Italy

Daniela gives us some more examples of gerunds used in subordinate clauses. Asking ourselves what questions the gerund answers can help us understand its role in a sentence.

Marika spiega - Conversazione - Part 1 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Daniela and Marika show us the basics of making conversation between 2 people who know each other as well as between strangers, or people of different ages.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Modi Indefiniti - Part 3 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Intermediate Intermediate

Italy

In this segment, Daniela talks about the gerund. As you will see, in Italian, the gerund is often used by itself, whereas in English we need an extra word before it — a conjunction or preposition. We are on more familiar ground when Daniela talks about using a gerund with the verb stare (to be) to form what we call the present continuous or present progressive.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Modi Indefiniti - Part 2 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Intermediate Intermediate

Italy

In Italian, there's not only a past participle, as in English, there is also a present participle. Many nouns and adjectives we use every day come from this tense, as well as from the past participle.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Modi Indefiniti - Part 1 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Intermediate Intermediate

Italy

Daniela explains what are called "indefinite modes." They are indefinite because they don't refer directly to a person or object. They commonly occur in a subordinate clause, and we need the context of the main clause to give us that information. There are three forms: the infinitive, the past participle, and the gerund.

L'Italia a tavola - Interrogazione sulla Campania View Series

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Today, Anna is playing with fire because she has to describe the very region her teacher is from. Anna knows her subject pretty well, but so does her teacher. Who will triumph?

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Piacere - Part 4 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

The concept of liking and loving is nuanced in a particular way in Italian. Really grasping it takes time, practice, and experience, but this lesson should help to avoid embarrassing mistakes and misunderstandings when talking about relationships in Italian.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Piacere - Part 3 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

There are two ways to use an indirect object pronoun with the verb piacere (to please, to be pleasing, to like). Daniela shows us how they work.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Piacere - Part 2 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Sometimes the subject of a sentence can be a verb in the infinitive or an entire clause. Let's see how the verb piacere works in these cases, in both simple and perfect tenses.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Piacere - Part 1 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Daniela tackles a verb that is tricky for English speakers: piacere (to like, to delight, to please). Since, as you will see, this verb works so differently than "to like," we have used the verb "to delight" as a translation in some cases, not for its exact meaning, but in order to match the construction with that of piacere.

COVID-19 - Domande frequenti - Part 2 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Marika talks about how one can contract coronavirus, the symptoms, and the guidelines to avoid getting infected.

COVID-19 - Domande frequenti - Part 1 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Everyone is talking about coronavirus. Marika addresses frequently asked questions about this recent, ongoing phenomenon.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Particella Ci e Ne - Part 6 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Daniela gives us plenty of examples of how to use ne and ci, those tricky little particles that mean so many different things and which can be quite a challenge for English speakers.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Particella Ci e Ne - Part 5 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Daniela gives us some more examples of how the particle ci is used. Lots of times it's superfluous and could technically be omitted but hardly ever is.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Particella Ci e Ne - Part 4 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Daniela talks about an unusual but common way we use the particle ci. In this segment she discusses volerci (to need, to take) and metterci (to employ, to put in). In English we use "it takes" and "it takes me/you/us/him/her/them" with an impersonal "it," so translating might very well create more problems than it solves. To help you understand how these particular verbs work, we have attempted, where possible, to use alternate translations to illustrate the grammatical structure of the sentences Daniela uses as examples.

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