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Marika spiega - Il verbo vedere - Part 3 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Intermediate Intermediate

Italy

Here are some more expressions featuring the verb vedere (to see). For non-native speakers, a few of them might be a little tricky to understand, but others might be very useful to learn and use.

Marika spiega - Il verbo vedere - Part 2 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Are you ready for plenty of expressions using the verb vedere (to see)? Andiamo a vedere (let's go see)!

Marika spiega - Il verbo vedere - Part 1 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

We take a deep dive into the common and very useful verb vedere (to see). First of all, we look at how it is conjugated. Then we go on to its meaning, as well as some expressions.

Marika spiega - Gli omonimi View Series

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Omonimi (homonyms) look and sound the same but have different meanings, sometimes wildly different meanings!

Marika spiega - Omofoni - Part 2 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Two words can sound the same because in one, there is an article beginning with L connected to the noun by way of an apostrophe (such as l'ago [the needle]) and in the other one, the first letter is L, such as lago [lake]. When we hear them, we distinguish them from the context, because otherwise, there is no way to know.

Marika spiega - Omofoni - Part 1 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

One tricky thing in lots of languages is when words sound the same but are written differently and have different meanings. In English, these are called, "homophones," part of the larger group, "homonyms."

Marika spiega - Articolo partitivo o preposizione articolata? View Series

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Marika gives us a trick for how to know if del, della, or degli (all meaning "of the") are articulated prepositions or partitive articles. Sounds complicated, but isn't really. See her previous videos about these grammar topics: preposizioni articolate - articoli partitivi.

Marika spiega - Parole con più significati - Part 3 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Find out the various different meanings of these words: campo, squadra, and verso.

Marika spiega - Parole con più significati - Part 2 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Ready for some more Italian words with various different meanings? Marika talks about albero, batteria, and dado.

Marika spiega - Parole con più significati - Part 1 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Marika talks about three words — piano, credenza, and tempo — that have something important in common. They all have multiple meanings, not just nuances, not just connotations. Technically, they are called polysemous or polysemic words.

Marika spiega - Articoli partitivi - Part 2 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Marika explains what partitive articles are all about and gives us some helpful examples.

Marika spiega - Articoli partitivi - Part 1 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Articoli partitivi, or partitive articles look like articoli articolati because they are formed with a preposition plus an article. But their function is different. Most of the time they are a way to say “some.” This lesson is about how to form them, and in future lessons, we will learn how to use them.

Marika spiega - Le preposizioni articolate - Part 6 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Marika adds the preposition con (with) to the list of prepositions that combine with definite articles.

Marika spiega - Le preposizioni articolate - Part 5 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Marika concentrates on the preposition su [on] in combination with various articles to form the very useful sul, sui, sugli, sulla, sulle and sull'.

Marika spiega - Le preposizioni articolate - Part 4 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Newbie Newbie

Italy

We look at the preposition in [in, to, at] and how it combines with the various definite articles.

Marika spiega - Le preposizioni articolate - Part 3 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Newbie Newbie

Italy

In this video, the preposition we combine with a definite article is da. It can mean "from," but also "to" and "at." So, combined with the different definite articles, it's going to mean "from the," "to the," or "at the."

Marika spiega - Le preposizioni articolate - Part 2 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Newbie Newbie

Italy

We look at the preposition a combined with different definite articles. This preposizione articolata is used, for example, in talking about the time: alle otto (at eight o'clock); about a manner or style: alla francese (French-style), al dente (not too cooked).

Marika spiega - Le preposizioni articolate - Part 1 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Newbie Newbie

Italy

After looking at simple prepositions, Marika talks about a special kind of preposition called una preposizione articolata. It just means that the preposition has a definite article attached to it. In this segment, she covers the ways the preposition di (of) combines with different articles to become a new complex preposition. For example, di + il = del.

Marika spiega - Preposizioni semplici - Part 3 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

We look at a few more prepositions and see the contexts in which they are used.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - 6) Proposizioni subordinate relative - Part 3 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Intermediate Intermediate

Italy

In this lesson, we look at implicit relative subordinate clauses, and how they are introduced. One of their main characteristics is that they use the infinitive of a verb, rather than a conjugated one.

Marika spiega - Preposizioni semplici - Part 2 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

We continue with simple prepositions, starting off with da (from). But da can also mean "to" or "at," so you won't want to miss this. Marika also explains when to use in or a regarding cities, countries, etc.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - 6) Proposizioni subordinate relative - Part 2 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Intermediate Intermediate

Italy

Daniela explains the relative pronouns used in forming a relative subordinate clause. She starts out with the explicit kind.

Marika spiega - Preposizioni semplici - Part 1 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

This video lesson is about simple prepositions, especially di (of, from, about) and a (to, at).

Corso di italiano con Daniela - 6) Proposizioni subordinate relative - Part 1 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Intermediate Intermediate

Italy

Daniela talks about two kinds of relative subordinate clauses — restrictive and explanatory — and how we punctuate them differently.

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