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Corso di italiano con Daniela
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176 Videos

Daniela teaches Italian in a classroom, complete with blackboard, chalk, eraser, and students. Her lessons are very popular and people love her spontaneity and teaching style. She addresses grammatical topics one by one, geared to both beginning and intermediate level students.

Videos
Showing 1-17 of 17 Totaling 1 hours 11 minutes

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Il congiuntivo - Part 1

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Daniela focuses on the present subjunctive and provides tips on how to recognize the subjunctive tense.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Il congiuntivo - Part 2

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Daniela continues her lesson on the present subjunctive, using the verbs parlare [to speak], vedere [to see], and partire [to leave].

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Il congiuntivo - Part 3

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Daniela homes in on the present subjunctive of the auxiliary verb essere [to be].

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Il congiuntivo - Part 4

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Daniela covers the present subjunctive for the following verbs: avere [to have], andare [to go], fare [to do], and bere [to drink],

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Il congiuntivo - Part 5

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Daniela covers the present subjunctive of these three verbs: rimanere [to remain, to stay], venire [to come], and dire [to say].

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Il congiuntivo - Part 6

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Daniela provides a list of verbs that always come before the subjunctive mood verbs. We'll see, however, that English doesn't follow the same rules.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Il congiuntivo - Part 7

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Daniela provides a nice long list of the so-called perception verbs and expressions that always precede the present subjunctive.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Il congiuntivo - Part 8

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Daniela highlights two verbs that do not call for the present subjunctive—the verbs vedere [to see] and sentire [to sense, to hear, to feel].

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Il congiuntivo - Part 9

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Daniela continues with verbs that require the present subjunctive, calling attention to the all-important verb sperare [to hope].

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Il congiuntivo - Part 10

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy Neapolitan

Daniela focuses on verbs and expressions that express uncertainty or doubt, and require the use of the subjunctive.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Il congiuntivo - Part 11

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Daniela talks about a special case scenario in which a verb in the infinitive may replace the subjunctive form in the subordinate clause. Learning this rule can make using certain verbs easier. She goes on to talk about impersonal forms of verbs where we need the subjunctive. This scenario is quite different from English, so we need to pay close attention.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Il congiuntivo - Part 12

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Daniela works on the expressions where the verb essere [to be] is followed the subjunctive in the subordinate clause. The expressions include: È una fortuna [It's a bit of luck] and È un peccato [It's a shame].

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Il congiuntivo - Part 13

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

The previous lesson ended with the verb essere (to be) plus adjectives. Now, Daniela goes on to tell us about the verb essere plus adverbs and then teaches us about a great shortcut for avoiding the subjunctive when using the word basta [it's enough, just]. Normally, basta signals the need for the subjunctive, but Daniela offers up some examples where the infinitive verb works best.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Il congiuntivo - Part 14

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

There are some special conjunctions that take the subjunctive and then che (that). There are several of them but they're quite similar to one another. Little by little, as you hear them used, they'll become part of your vocabulary.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Il congiuntivo - Part 15

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Daniela goes over words or expressions that trigger the use of the subjunctive, including affinché (so that), a meno che (unless), and senza che (without).

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Il congiuntivo - Part 16

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy Neapolitan

Daniela covers comparative sentences that require the use of the subjunctive.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Il congiuntivo - Part 17

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Daniela wraps up the lessons on the subjunctive with some sentences that begin with che (that), calling for the subjunctive. She also discusses some cases in which we can either use the subjunctive mood or the future tense.

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