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Corso di italiano con Daniela
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176 Videos

Daniela teaches Italian in a classroom, complete with blackboard, chalk, eraser, and students. Her lessons are very popular and people love her spontaneity and teaching style. She addresses grammatical topics one by one, geared to both beginning and intermediate level students.

Videos
Showing 1-5 of 5 Totaling 0 hours 16 minutes

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Forma negativa - Part 1

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Daniela explains how to turn a positive statement into a negative one, and how to form a negative question and its negative answer. The magic word is non (not).

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Forma negativa - Part 2

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

In the last lesson we learned to place non (not) before the verb in a negative sentence, but when there are other words involved, it gets a bit more complicated, especially when we have object pronouns in the mix.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Forma negativa - Part 3

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

To express negation, the adverb non (not) can precede not only nouns, but verbs, adjectives, pronouns, prepositions, and adverbs, as well. Daniela shows us how.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Forma negativa - Part 4

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Double negatives are, in fact, allowed in Italian. And Daniela shows us how there can be multiple negations in one phrase. In English, where double negatives are not allowed, we have extra words to get around this rule. We use, for example, "it's not anything" or" not ever," instead of the incorrect "not nothing" or "not never." But it's important to be able to manage all these negatives in perfect tenses where we have a conjugated auxiliary verb and a past participle, and that is what Daniela explains in this lesson.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Forma negativa - Part 5

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Daniela concludes this lesson about double negatives explaining that in some cases, when using double negatives with compound verbs — in other words, auxiliary verbs with past participles — there are some exceptions to be aware of.

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