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Corso di italiano con Daniela - Ora - Part 2 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Ora, the word for "now" can be combined with a number of other words to means something that has to do with time, but that indicates more precisely when a period begins or ends.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Ora - Part 1 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Daniela looks at the various contexts for using the adverb ora (now) and its synonyms and variants.

Marika commenta - L'ispettore Manara - Espressioni idiomatiche - Part 2 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Marika explains some of the idiomatic expressions used in the TV series, Commissario Manara. These expressions are ones Italians use every day in dealing with other people, so you won't want to miss this.

Marika commenta - L'ispettore Manara - Espressioni idiomatiche - Part 1 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Some idiomatic expressions need some explanation and Marika is here to do just that, this time using examples from the popular TV series, Commissario Manara. You'll be speaking Italian like a native in no time.

Alberto Angela - Meraviglie - EP. 4 - Part 15 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Intermediate Intermediate

Italy

The final segment of this tour of Umbria and Tuscany brings to the walls of Pisa and its famous schools of higher learning. As usual, Alberto Angela gives us some insight into how and why things happened as they did, as Pisa developed into one of the most beautiful and important cities in Italy.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Fino a e Finché - Part 2 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Adv-Intermediate Adv-Intermediate

Italy

In English, the difference between "until" and "as long as" is quite distinct, but in Italian, it's a little blurry because the presence of the negative word non (not) might change the meaning of a phrase or it might not. When the meaning is not altered by its presence, the word, in this case non (not), is "pleonastic." We're talking about finché and finche non.

Alberto Angela - Meraviglie - EP. 4 - Part 14 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Intermediate Intermediate

Italy

The fresco depicting the Last Judgement is almost like a photograph of the Middle Ages. Alberto Angela shows us where the sinners ended up and what happened to them in Hell.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Fino a e Finché - Part 1 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

A student asked Daniela to explain the difference between finché and the adverb fino. In fact, these words are tricky for English speakers to grasp. We're talking about "until" and "as long as," and in questions, "how far" and "how long."

Marika spiega - Conversazione - Part 2 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Marika and Daniela continue their conversation about making conversation in Italian. They even talk a little bit about baby talk, Italian style, including the vezzeggiativo (affectionate) form of adjectives.

Alberto Angela - Meraviglie - EP. 4 - Part 13 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Intermediate Intermediate

Italy

We're still at the Camposanto in Pisa. Alberto Angela shows us a wonderful fresco of the Last Judgment, and tells us the story of the artist as well as what is depicted.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Modi Indefiniti - Part 4 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Intermediate Intermediate

Italy

Daniela gives us some more examples of gerunds used in subordinate clauses. Asking ourselves what questions the gerund answers can help us understand its role in a sentence.

Marika spiega - Conversazione - Part 1 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Daniela and Marika show us the basics of making conversation between 2 people who know each other as well as between strangers, or people of different ages.

Alberto Angela - Meraviglie - EP. 4 - Part 12 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Intermediate Intermediate

Italy

Alberto Angela takes us through what is actually a gallery of ancient art inside this cemetery, and focuses on the sarcophagi, each with its story to tell.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Modi Indefiniti - Part 3 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Intermediate Intermediate

Italy

In this segment, Daniela talks about the gerund. As you will see, in Italian, the gerund is often used by itself, whereas in English we need an extra word before it — a conjunction or preposition. We are on more familiar ground when Daniela talks about using a gerund with the verb stare (to be) to form what we call the present continuous or present progressive.

Alberto Angela - Meraviglie - EP. 4 - Part 11 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Intermediate Intermediate

Italy

Alberto Angela recounts some interesting facts and legends surrounding the roof of the Bapistery and the Camposanto [cemetery].

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Modi Indefiniti - Part 2 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Intermediate Intermediate

Italy

In Italian, there's not only a past participle, as in English, there is also a present participle. Many nouns and adjectives we use every day come from this tense, as well as from the past participle.

Alberto Angela - Meraviglie - EP. 4 - Part 10 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Intermediate Intermediate

Italy

We learn a great deal about the third structure at the Piazza dei Miracoli in Pisa: the Baptistery. We learn about wonders we can see and wonders we can't see.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Modi Indefiniti - Part 1 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Intermediate Intermediate

Italy

Daniela explains what are called "indefinite modes." They are indefinite because they don't refer directly to a person or object. They commonly occur in a subordinate clause, and we need the context of the main clause to give us that information. There are three forms: the infinitive, the past participle, and the gerund.

Alberto Angela - Meraviglie - EP. 4 - Part 9 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Intermediate Intermediate

Italy

We go inside the Pisa Cathedral and see how marvelous it is, from the granite columns to the majestic pulpit designed by Giovanni Pisano, which, miraculously, survived the fire of 1595.

L'Italia a tavola - Interrogazione sulla Campania View Series

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Today, Anna is playing with fire because she has to describe the very region her teacher is from. Anna knows her subject pretty well, but so does her teacher. Who will triumph?

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Piacere - Part 4 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

The concept of liking and loving is nuanced in a particular way in Italian. Really grasping it takes time, practice, and experience, but this lesson should help to avoid embarrassing mistakes and misunderstandings when talking about relationships in Italian.

Alberto Angela - Meraviglie - EP. 4 - Part 8 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Intermediate Intermediate

Italy

Why does the Leaning Tower of Pisa lean? Alberto answers this question and others about one of the most famous monuments in the world.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Piacere - Part 3 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

There are two ways to use an indirect object pronoun with the verb piacere (to please, to be pleasing, to like). Daniela shows us how they work.

Corso di italiano con Daniela - Piacere - Part 2 View Series View This Episode

Difficulty: difficulty - Beginner Beginner

Italy

Sometimes the subject of a sentence can be a verb in the infinitive or an entire clause. Let's see how the verb piacere works in these cases, in both simple and perfect tenses.

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