Lezioni Italiano

Argomenti

"Get Lost" in Italian

A new movie featured on Yabla employs a verb we don't see very often except in particular military or work situations. The use of this verb has inspired us to talk about what we say in Italian when we leave a place, or want someone else to.

 

Congedare (formal, uncommon in normal, everday conversation)

Congedare is "to invite somebody to leave": The reflexive form congedarsi is "to ask for and obtain permission to leave."  In the following example, a waiter is hanging around a bit too long at the table he is serving. One of the two women having drinks is basically asking him to beat it. 

Congedati. -E certo... Con permesso.

Take your leave. -Of course... Please excuse me.

Captions 77-78, Sei mai stata sulla luna? film - Part 12

 Play Caption

BANNER PLACEHOLDER

In the following example from a movie about Adriano Olivetti (of typewriter fame), Karen had been in the military, so it was natural for her to use the verb congedarsi.

E come mai è in Italia? -Mi sono congedata. Volevo dedicarmi un po' alla mia vera passione, fotografando l'Italia.

And how come you're in Italy? -I asked to be discharged. I wanted to devote myself a bit to my true passion, photographing Italy.

Captions 51-54, Adriano Olivetti La forza di un sogno Ep. 1 - Part 16

 Play Caption

 

Licenziare, licenziarsi

If she had resigned from a normal job, she might have said the following, using the reflexive, and therefore the auxiliary essere (to be).

Mi sono licenziata (I quit my job).

 

If she had been fired, it would have been transitive, not reflexive: Note the use of the auxiliary verb avere (to have).

Mi hanno licenziato (they fired me -- I was fired).

Mi hanno licenziata (they fired me -- I was fired [and I am a woman]).

 

Noun form of congedare: il congedo

The noun form congedo is a bit more common than the verb form, especially in reference to a leave of absence or, as in the following example, maternity leave.

 

E voglio che le donne in maternità abbiano un anno intero di congedo.

And I want for women who are pregnant to have a whole year of maternity leave.

Captions 27-28, Adriano Olivetti La forza di un sogno Ep. 1 - Part 10

 Play Caption

 

Another word for congedo is aspettativa. 

La preside mi ha detto che hai inoltrato la domanda di aspettativa al dipartimento.

The principal told me that you had forwarded the request for a leave of absence to the department.

Caption 49, Provaci Ancora Prof! S1E2 - Un amore pericoloso - Part 12

 Play Caption

 

Sending someone away with no regard or need for being polite is also common. You can say it with good intentions in the appropriate context, as in the following example:

Sono due giorni che ti porti dietro 'sta [questa] febbre. -Con questa bella esperienza del camion-frigorifero sicuramente ti è salita, quindi vattene a casa, ci penso io.

It's been two days that you've been carrying around this fever. -With the lovely experience of the refrigerator truck, it's surely risen, so get yourself home, I'll take care of it.

Captions 38-40, Il Commissario Manara S1EP2 - Vendemmia tardiva - Part 11

 Play Caption

 

Vattene is also a way to get rid of someone in a more aggressive, emotional way.

No, sei un bugiardo! Vattene! Se mi dai il tempo di... -Non ti voglio più vedere.

No, you're a liar! Get out of here! If you give me the time to... -I don't want to see you again.

Captions 102-103, Questione di Karma Rai Cinema - Part 16

 Play Caption

 

Often vattene is expanded to become even stronger: Vattene via! (Go away! Get lost!)

Taking vattene apart

Let's take vattene apart. (Va-[t]te-ne): vai is the informal imperative of the verb andare, but it is often shortened to va'. We could say vai via, but vattene adds 2 more elements. It personalizes it with a sort of reflexive te (you, yourself). In addition, it implies that you should leave the place you are in.  That's where the particle ne comes in, to mean "from here." The double T allows you to practically spit the words out and can really get the message across.

The infinitive form: andarsene

This compound verb in the infinitive would be andarsene: With it's connected object pronoun and particle, it's also called a verbo pronominale (pronominal verb — having to do with pronouns). Read about pronominal verbs here.

Andarsene vuol dire andare via da qualche luogo. Che maleducato il tuo amico, se n'è andato senza neanche salutarmi. Andarsene ha anche il significato di morire.

"To leave" means "to go away from some venue." "How rude your friend is, he went off without even saying goodbye." "To leave" also has the meaning of dying.

Captions 30-33, Marika spiega Il verbo andare

 Play Caption

 

And if I am the one leaving, I'll conjugate andarsene in the first person singular:

Me ne vado (I'm leaving [this place], I'll leave).

 

These are only some of the ways we leave or tell someone to leave. But please don't leave, cari amici di Yabla. Stay tuned for the next lesson!

BANNER PLACEHOLDER

Vocabulary

Potrebbero interessarti: